Last edited by Tojacage
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

1 edition of Wintu myths found in the catalog.

Wintu myths

Cora Alice Du Bois

Wintu myths

by Cora Alice Du Bois

  • 354 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in Berkeley .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wintun mythology,
  • Wintun Indians,
  • Folklore

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Cora Du Bois and Dorothy Demetracopoulou...
    SeriesUniversity of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology -- v. 28, no. 5, University of California publications -- v. 28, no. 5.
    ContributionsDemetracopoulou, Dorothy, 1905- joint author
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE99.W79 D8
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[279]-403 p.
    Number of Pages403
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24899614M
    LC Control Number32000024
    OCLC/WorldCa1733039

    A Bag of Bones - The Wintu Myths of a Trinity River Indian. by Mason, Marcelle and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Native American creation myths User Review - Not Available - Book Verdict. Dating back to , linguist and ethnographer Curtin compiled the mythological data he gathered on the Wintu and Yana Indian groups. Read full review.

    She served as the president of the American Anthropological Society and was the author of many books, including The People of Alor, Wintu Myths, and Social Forces in the Southeast. Thomas Buckley is an independent scholar. His most recent book is Standing Ground: Yurok Indian Spirituality, Brand: Cora Du Bois; Thomas Buckley. "Wintu Myths". "University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology" * Hogue, Helen S., and Margaret Guilford-Kardell. "Wintu Trails". Revised edition; originally published in Shasta Historical Society, Reading, California. * Hoveman, Alice R. "Journey to Justice: The Wintu People and the.

    Despite the title, which suggests that this is a comprehensive study of Native American creation myths, this is actually a very good set of animal myths from two tribes of California, the Wintu and Yana. These tribes inhabited the northern Central Valley; the Yana are closely related to . Entertaining book about monster folklore of Canada and the United States, including several Native American legends. Fantastical Creatures and Magical Beasts Monsters: Evil Beings, Mythical Beasts, and All Manner of Imaginary Terrors Giants, Monsters, and Dragons.


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Wintu myths by Cora Alice Du Bois Download PDF EPUB FB2

Wintu Myths Paperback – by Doroth du Bois, Cora; Dememtracopoulou (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Doroth du Bois, Cora; Dememtracopoulou. On the cutting edge of world-systems theory comes The Wintu and Their Neighbors, the first case study to compare and contrast systematically an indigenous Native American society with the modern world at an interdisciplinary approach that combines sociology, anthropology, political science, geography, and history, Christopher Chase-Dunn and Kelly M.

Mann have scoured the Cited by: Creation Myths of Primitive America, by Jeremiah Curtin, [], full text etext at Creation Myths of Primitive America: Wintu Myths: Hawt. OCLC Number: Notes: Title page includes original imprint: Berkeley, University of California press, Description: [] pages ; 24 cm.

Genre/Form: Folklore: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Du Bois, Cora Alice, Wintu myths. Berkeley, University of California Press, A bag of bones; the Wintu myths of a Trinity River Indian [Grant Towendolly, Marcelle Masson] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Traditional Wintu myths told by Grant Towendolly, primarily to Marcelle Masson, who transcribed them and wrote background material including a biographical sketch of the Towendolly family.

Some myths were written down by Towendolly himself and Pages: Creation Myths of Primitive America, by Jeremiah Curtin, [], full text etext at Creation Myths of Primitive America: Wintu Myths: Norwan Sacred Texts Native America California Index Previous Next. Wintu version of a common California Indian tale about a girl who violates taboos and becomes a rolling-head monster.

The Great Fire: Patwin myth about Coyote saving the world from a fire. The Wintu language is one of the Wintuan languages; it is also called Wintu. The religious stories and legends of the Trinity River Wintu were told by Grant Towendolly to Marcelle Masson, who published them in A Bag of Bones ().

: A BAG OF BONES: The Wintu Myths of a Trinity River Indian (Legends of the Wintu Indians of Northern California): A BAG OF BONES: The Wintu Myths of a Trinity River Indian (Legends of the Wintu Indians of Northern California), Masson, Marcelle, Naturegraph Co.,p, trade pb, covers bumped/scuffed/creased, text clean, solid binding Traditional Wintu myths told by Grant Towendolly, primarily to Marcelle Masson, who transcribed them and wrote background material including a biographical sketch of the Towendolly family.

Some myths were written down by Towendolly himself and some were dictated to. The myths and legends in this book have been selected both for their excellence as stories and because they illustrate the distinctive nature of Native American storytelling.

A collection of Native American myths and legends. Wintu Myths. Berkeley: University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, (), -- Legends of the Wintu Indians of Northern California, by Marcelle Masson.

These stories come from the Wintu Indians of the northern Sacramento Valley, where they dwelled for thousands of years. As Grant Towendolly, Wintu philosopher, mystic, and shaman, retells the legends we learn that streams, rocks, trees, canyons, cliffs, ordinary scenery to us, often held special significance.

The Creation A Maidu Legend. In the beginning there was no sun, no moon, no stars. All was dark, and everywhere there was only water. A raft came floating on the water. It came from the north, and in it were two persons,--Turtle and Father-of-the-Secret- Society. The stream flowed very rapidly.

Then from the sky a rope of feathers, was let down. The Ghost Dance was a significant but too often disregarded transformative historical movement with particular impact on the Native peoples of northern California. The spiritual energies of this?great wave.

as Peter Nabokov has called it, have passed down to the present day among Native Californians, some of whose contemporary individual and communal lives can be understood only in.

A Bag of Bones book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Stories from the Wintu Indians of the northern Sacramento Valley, whe /5. Demetracopoulou, Cora du Bois, A Study of Wintu Mythology, The Journal of American Folklore, Vol.

45, No. (Oct. - Dec., ), pp. Creation Myth of the Wintu Tribe of California by Sarah. Creation Myth of the Wintu Tribe of California. It is the ìworld before this oneî where the creation myths of the American Indians almost invariably begin.

Their stories form a complete system: the earth falls from a perfect, yet crowded harmony into collision and conflict before finally transforming into the world now existing.

Traditional Wintu myths told by Grant Towendolly| primarily to Marcelle Masson| who transcribed them and wrote background material including a biographical sketch of the Towendolly family.

Some myths were written down by Towendolly himself and some were dictated to other members of the Masson family.; Grant Towendolly. She served as the president of the American Anthropological Society and was the author of many books, including The People of Alor, Wintu Myths, and Social Forces in the Southeast.

Thomas Buckley is an independent scholar. His most recent book is Standing Ground: Yurok Indian Spirituality, –The term mythology can refer to a body of myths or to any traditional story. A myth is a sacred narrative explaining how the world and humankind came to be in their present form.

The main characters in myths are usually gods or supernatural heroes. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato.First published in as 'Creation Myths of Primitive America in Relation to the Religious History and Mental Development of Mankind.' Very important book about the Mt.

Shasta region. This book is entirely about northern California legends. Curtin uses Wintu and Yana myths as representative of all native American creation myths. Mt. Shasta.